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Parental satisfaction: The effects of perceived parental self-efficacy, care-giving role and child age

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Naomi Hamill
Michele Fleming
James T. Neill

Australian Journal of Psychology, 54(1), 32-39, 2002

Citations

Hamill, N. R., Fleming, M. J., & Neill, J. T. (in preparation). Parental satisfaction: The effects of perceived parental self-efficacy, care-giving role and child age.

Hamill, N. R., Fleming, M. J., & Neill, J. T. (2002). Parental satisfaction: The effects of perceived parental self-efficacy, care-giving role and child age. Poster presented at the 37th Annual Australian Psychological Society Conference, September 27-October 1, Gold Coast, Australia.

Hamill, N. R., Fleming, M. J., & Neill, J. T. (2002). Parental satisfaction: The effects of perceived parental self-efficacy, care-giving role and child age [abstract]. Australian Journal of Psychology, 54 (Suppl.), 31.

Abstract

Research into parental satisfaction has found no predictors that can be determined with assurance. Conflicting research abounds in areas such as parent gender and partner status in relation to parental satisfaction. This study was designed to examine the effect of parental self-efficacy, care-giving role, child age, parent gender, employment status, education level and partner status on parental satisfaction in an Australian setting. The confirmation of factors common to perceived parental self-efficacy was also investigated.  Two hundred and ten parents with a mean age of 35 years completed a questionnaire measuring their perceived parental self-efficacy, education and demographic variables.

A multiple regression analysis revealed three significant predictors of parental satisfaction: parental self-efficacy, and child age and care-giving role were negative predictors. Parent gender, employment status, education level and partner status failed to achieve significance in the regression model. A factor analysis revealed two factors for perceived parental self-efficacy, which were providing discipline and routine for a child, and providing nurturance and support. As this is the first study investigating the impact of care-giving role on parental satisfaction, further research needs to be conducted to confirm this and the findings for the effect of parental self-efficacy and child age.

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