Mak Knott Neill 2012 Internationalising the psychology curriculum

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Internationalising the psychology curriculum: An inter-disciplinary approach to developing academics’ and students’ intercultural capabilities

MAK, A. S. (University of Canberra), NEILL, J. T. (University of Canberra), & KNOTT, V. (University of Canberra)

anita.mak@canberra.edu.au

Poster presented at the 47th Annual Australian Psychological Society Conference, 27-30 September, 2012, Perth, Australia

Abstract

In an overview of the recent move towards internationalising the psychology curriculum in the United States, Leong and colleagues (2012) have identified the enhancement of intercultural competence as a major challenge; it is difficult to define and even more difficult to teach and assess. A pioneering team of educators in Australia (Freeman et al., 2009) articulated a similar challenge in their national project on embedding the development of intercultural competence in Business education. The Business educators advocated that program leaders should engage communities of academics in sharing good practices in intercultural competence development and evaluating their impact on student experience and outcomes. In this work-in-progress paper, we describe and discuss how we have incorporated Freeman and colleagues’ recommended approach in an action research project titled “Internationalisation at Home: Enhancing the Intercultural Capability of Teachers, Students, and Curricula”. This two-year project is funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (now Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching) Grants Scheme (ALTC PP 10-1810). The inter-disciplinary project aims to internationalise the learning and teaching practices of Business and Health higher education through intercultural capacity building of academics in several fields of study - business, nursing, psychology, and pharmacy. The conduct of 18 focus groups with stakeholder groups of industry professionals, academics, and domestic and international students informed the design of Business- and Health-specific professional development (PD) workshops at two Australian universities. The workshops attracted 64 academic participants. Faculty-based academic leaders then established and facilitated learning circle meetings, supporting small communities of academics to plan and implement the embedding of intercultural competence development in their own teaching practices and curriculum re-design. In this paper, we will outline interim project learnings regarding intercultural capacity building. We will report findings on teacher and student outcomes, giving examples of novel class activities and assessment tasks in psychology education. We will discuss the project progress within an inter-disciplinary context and consider its implications for meeting the challenges in internationalising the psychology curriculum.

Reference

APA style

Mak, A. S., Knott, V., & Neill, J. T. (2012). Internationalising the psychology curriculum Internationalising the psychology curriculum: An inter-disciplinary approach to developing academics’ and students’ intercultural capabilities. Poster presented at the 47th Annual Australian Psychological Society Conference, September 27-30, Perth, Australia.

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